Rambling Along Like Fridays

Range circuit

There are so many different perspectives in the world, how can they all be right and mine be wrong?

Not so long ago, my life changed, it was a catastrophic event that stopped me from pursuing my dreams.  And when it was over, everyone’s opinion of me was minimized:

“Well, at least you’re alive.”

My life has always been more than just breathing.  My best use practices with air included running and sailing, as well as the hard work, dedication and socializing, in equal parts.  I was a Jackie of All Trades, from slinging a hammer to climbing a telephone pole and I liked it.  And of course there was wiggle room, my mistakes were lessons and I self-corrected and moved on.

I had started my TechnyGal brand, and unlike thousands of other people on the internet, I had discovered a way to monetize social media with zero investment!  So, my ROI (Return On Investment) was always growing.  I was invited to conventions, symposiums and was asked to be interviewed.  I was on conference calls, doing business with companies in the UK and here in the states.  And I was writing, it was the other love in my life, which I had put off to raise a family.

So, when the doctors told me that I would live, I was confused.   It wasn’t my standard of living, what I had become accustomed to, but some version of “Good enough”, their definition of what my life would now be.

Today, I’m reminded of my former self, before I got sick.  When I could walk, talk and run free… just rambling along like Fridays.

I came up with the idea, while watching a television show on NBC called This Is Us .  The show depicts the fictional Pearson family by moments of insights, refreshing unconditional love and filtered perspectives, some done via flashbacks and hindsight as to how they grow into themselves.

It’s a vignette slice of our society, served in proper proportion by the clever use of interracial triplets, that’s both entertaining and relatable.  From male to female to Caucasian to African-American, we are all Americans.  We share the same concerns, have the same overweight issues, and abuses we read about.

Maya Angelou wrote that we are more alike than we are different, think about that and then understand… there are millions of people with different opinions and none are more important to you, than your own.

I was told that I should be happy that I’m alive.  I struggle with that…  Of course there are moments when I’m happy, but also moments when I’m sad.  It’s difficult to not experience self-pity, after all I’m deaf in one ear, can’t walk without assistance and can’t pick up the work pace that I started.  But I’m told that there’s a good chance that my disease will go into remission, and like all people we do better when we can be hopeful.

I’ve started Rambling as a way stay motivated, to just keeping going… On & On.  What’s your motivation?

 

 

 

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Filed under AARP, Baby boomers, Healthcare, Life, Uncategorized

Ordinary Earthlings

# earth 2 moon tech

Imagine, you’re an earthling and you’re extraordinary.

I’m not sure, but I think that today’s conversation has to be about complacency.  Because there’s so much that we’re not doing, and we keep making excuses for why we’re not doing anything.

I’m reminded of my younger days, when I carried picket signs and stood up against all that was wrong with the world. From boycotting manufacturers that polluted rivers to oil refineries that supported apartheid, we stood in solidarity.

My activism was full of energy, fueled with a passion to improve life. I held hands, prepared care packages and sang songs for those who couldn’t sing.  Society seemed simple and factored neatly into the human process that is, to make life better for everyone.

Television mirrored society’s progress, from Father Knows Best to keeping it All In The Family.   There was a learning curve, and we had heated discussions by the water cooler.  We exchanged ideas, tried to see the other person’s point of view and were equally appalled by our shortcomings.  When Sammy Davis Jr. kissed Archie Bunker, we collectively gasped, then laughed.  We women cheered when Edith empowered by menopause was no longer stifled and screamed “No!” at her husband.

Lately, I’ve revisited those memories.  Because like you, I’ve been tip-toeing around in my dainty lady shoes, because I’m older and like it when the house is quiet.  But really, I do want to shove my feet into a pair of work boots and to go stomping about!

So much has gone awry and we’ve remained quiet. Watching as reputable news sources were attacked and turning the volume way down when what was being said wasn’t to our liking.  We even muted the voices of the victims and as such, emboldened the perpetrators.

Meanwhile the planet kept turning and our technology grew by algorithms into big data, self-sustaining, machine to machine, deep learning. And as quiet as it’s kept, that’s really a good thing, because so few of us know how any of this works. Leaving a talented few to be wooed by Fortune 500 companies.  As people discover that they’re unemployable and become “The Untalented” too many, a reminder that efficient technology doesn’t care.

It’s fall out from our complacency,  when we stopped trying to do good things and let bad things slip through.   We see it in the cost of a college education that has sky-rocketed, and public schools with mandates that teach kids for a test rather than a relevant skill for entering the job market.

And it happened on our watch, when we stopped protesting to ensure a future that included a place for all of us.  When we became complacent, we stopped being awesome.

Today, the untalented interact mindlessly with technology, hours spent on social media and on virtual reality that impedes their understanding of technology and it’s impact on future generations.

Technology is self-sustaining, self-replicating, self-repairing and has a passion for deep learning.  It’s a work horse, that will do well to protect us from us, when we get hacked.  Hopefully keeping us safe in its If Then/Than This loop, as we realize it was never an ultimatum or a failsafe.

The good news is that I woke up this morning, breathing.  I crawled out of bed and that’s a beginning, then I thought about you, and that maybe you too woke up…

“Imagine, you’re an earthling & that you’re extraordinary & then, quick do something extraordinary!”

 

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Technology’s Invitation Protect Your Data

cloud circuit

“Big Data”  Like its cousin, “The Internet of Things” was given a lame name.  Either the scientists who worked on the technology were being lazy, didn’t have an iota of creativity, or they just named it with a footnote, so they could get back to whatever else they were doing!  However big data, like the air we breathe, has become part of our human story.

Recently my daughter confessed that she just clicks and agrees to a website’s User Privacy and Terms of Agreement without reading it. She claims she doesn’t have time or didn’t want to read all the legal jargon.  Her generation does a lot of mindlessly clicking and willingly sharing their personal data, it’s almost a cultural.  And companies know this, it’s one way they’ve been able to amass such a large amount of data.

Just willy-nilly clicking “Yes” to get the latest app or to log onto a hot website. The alternative is to knowingly deny ourselves of technology that we want, like Tinder and Pokémon Go.

But as a parent, it distresses me.  I’m the by-product of the cold war, having lived through the espionage age, I’m cautious and leery by design.  Truth is, I read George Orwell’s 1984 and dystopias frighten me.

Big Data presents a picture from datasets to data points, and for good or evil, the picture grows as we go along.  It’s continually gathered, collected and processed.  And the enterprises that collect, store and process our personal data have become treasure troves, susceptible to breach and targeted by hackers on the dark internet.

I was trying to understand why we don’t do a better job of protecting our data.  Maybe in an over populated world, we humans are lonely.  That would partially account for why so many of us open unsolicited emails that simple say “Hi Friend”.

Maybe its need and not greed that motivates us.  What if being desperate has that affect?

The truth of the matter is, not all data can be protected.   But in three months, we’ll see  how companies do business handling personal data in the European market, when the European Union’s GPDR goes into effect. There are hurdles for sure, but as Cloud technology continues to advance and processing data at blazing speeds is the new norm, we’ll have to do better.

It seems to me, if changing our passwords on a monthly basis helps, why wouldn’t we?  Just asking…  Technology invites us to protect ourselves.

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Filed under Apps, Big Data, Privacy, technology

~Personal Data~ Come What May 25, 2018

Tech Total Solar Eclispe

Preparedness, isn’t that the other reason for a good night’s rest?

On May 25, 2018, we’ll Wake Up to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which will forever change how enterprises collect, gather, store and process personal data.

And while those on this side of the Great Pond might think it’ll be business as usual, they’d be well advised to become aware and acknowledge that during these days of digital transformation, the world has grown smaller. That is, what happens over there will have an impact over here.

We need to be mindful that even if we’re physically over here, we might not be immune to upcoming changes in the EU, that the global market isn’t limited to consumers, but also includes those that might be our business partners, employees or independent contractors, from whom we’ve collected personal data.

Hybrid Cloud technology, and sharing software have allowed small businesses to transform in such a big way, that even the less tech savvy have collected and stored personal data.  It’s imperative that we’re aware of the responsibility, and we’re in line with new regulations.

Right now might be a good time to check that our Vendors are also data compliant and that we’re familiar with the handling of personal data, because as quiet as it’s kept those policies might be legislated here, as hefty penalties might roll down hill.

So, maybe it’s okay that only a few are concerned with the GPDR, after all we’re thousands of miles away… but in a digital world, can we afford to ignore the ramifications?

We are also citizens, who have willingly shared a tremendous amount of personal data.   We’ve played games and used Apps for free, not giving a second thought to our millions of finger swipes that have been used to collect data and then used as payment, in this our virtual and augmented reality.

Come May, all that will change.  In addition obtaining consent, businesses will be required to have proper encryption for assured security, those businesses who store personal data to fulfill the purpose for which the data was collected will also have to:

  • Audit on regular, documented basis.
  • Incorporate technical measures to protect personal data from unauthorized access
  • Antivirus software that provides both email & browser protection.
  • Firewall
  • Regular Automatic Back Up of personal data
  • Enterprise Wi-Fi network password protected
  • Remote access is only possible via Virtual Private Network (VPN)
  • Privileged accounts only from dedicated devices & with limited access
  • Data leakage prevention software to protect sensitive personal data
  • Procedure for monitoring, detecting, analyzing & reporting security incidents developed and communicated within the enterprise.
  • Prevention of automated decision making & profiling
  • Data portability protection
  • The right to have their personal data erased, i.e., “the right to be forgotten”.
  • The right to ensure inaccuracies in personal data are corrected
  • A general description of technology and organizational security measures, as part of records data of processing activities. Regular updating.
  • Procedures and processes set up in case of data breach.
  • Privacy by design principles in place for new processes or products that are being employed.

 

Yes, it’s a great big world out there that has somehow become incredibly small. Come what may, shouldn’t we be prepared?

http://www.computerweekly.com   https://ukcloud.com/

 

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Filed under cyber-security, GPDR, technology, Uncategorized

AARP the Greatest Big Data

Business logo

Is it just me, or have 76.4 million other Baby Boomers, noticed the dismal failure of  AARP?

Once taunted as a Silver Tsunami, we Baby Boomers were to be a force to be reckoned with! And AARP was first to identify our numbers. I started to receive the mass mailing four years before my 50th birthday!   I was so annoyed, as it was a stark reminder that I had reached the half century benchmark.

And then, I started to think of myself as being special, being included sometimes has that affect.  And AARP mailings were upbeat and exciting.  Being fifty had it’s perks and one of them was being one of 76.4 million Baby Boomers that were invited to join an elite membership!

Now eight years later, here I am feeling mostly left out. The strength in our numbers, as more than a consumer are disappointing and on a political scale, non-existing.  It’s as though our potential which once sizzled, has fizzled and faded out.

AARP, the united front of teachers which evolved into a productive aging machine, was consciously aware of health insurance, but shied away from starting it’s own insurance.  It was a community based organization that wouldn’t enter the political arena and didn’t count its membership, as a voting bloc.

And AARP’s membership swelled.  But instead of becoming a supplier of information pertinent to its membership, a powerful knowledge dispensary like Google, AARP became a supplier/distributor of stale information targeted to old Americans.  It’s branding was marketed to an organic audience, to which they teased, “You don’t know AARP”.

Famous Baby Boomers became AARP spokespeople with no qualifications, or passion other than they, like all the rest of us had just aged and gotten old.  Apparently aging is an equal opportunist.

Whoopie Goldberg, the Baby Boomer comedian and Tom Hanks, the beloved actor who successfully portrayed real life Baby Boomer heroes, like Captain Sully who landed a commercial airplane on the Hudson River.

I was invited to participate in Boomer Technology in Boston, where I was allowed to interview AARP workers.  At one convention I wrote about an AARP initiative, computer classes for older Americans across America being led by young people, these they cleverly called AARP-TEK.

Ironically, everyone seemed prophetically aware of the impact of technology on an aging population.  But there was no urgency or sense of purposefulness, it was as if AARP could out-smart the smart technology by simply co-existing and entering the workplace.

We were the original pioneers of the World Wide Web; we lauded technology and intentionally installed cable into our homes, like some Orwellian Big Brother interior designer.  We welcomed that first fertile layer of smart technology and watched it as it grew.  It’s important to note, that back then we had a choice, both in policy and legislation and we understood the importance of Net Neutrality.

The doctrine “To serve and not be served” makes us complacent and passive aggressive.  Our vast numbers scream democracy, but we whisper in our collective activism, with all the vulnerabilities of an aging population.  We are faced with much more than just being prey to the usual scam artists.  As government supplements are snatched away and replaced with crumbs.

New technology is being developed so fast, just as we are slowing down.  Just as we are faced with our own moments of dementia, we’re being exposed to sophisticated hacks by cyber criminals.

It’s hard to look back and not see where we didn’t make a difference, but that’s the thing about growing old… One realizes too late, that youth is wasted on the young.  We think of our job as being done, when in fact it’s just transforming.  I remember analog technology’s metamorphosis into digital technology, but barely recognize old friends.

But there are success stories; many of my friends now walk around on titanium knees. We laugh and joke, as if they can run faster.  That’s the result of an active imagination that watched a lot of television.  It’s left a strong impression on us and we believe, if the Bionic Man and Bionic Woman could do it, then “Hell Yeah” we could do it too!

Thanks to technology, our expectations have grown. We’re living longer, with chronic illnesses that once killed humans.  It’s a clear indication that we’re pioneers of aging in a digital era and that we’re not our grandparents at this age.

Recently I’ve been thinking how the greatest ideas sometimes remain dormant.   That without fuel or a guidance system, those ideas aren’t engaging and don’t take hold.  It’s then that we aren’t trying to improve life.  Which seems such a waste of time, why else are we alive if we aren’t meant to make life better?

And so that’s what technology is for.  It is meant to make us the great contenders and doers, starting small businesses with which to cater to “US”.

History shows us how life might’ve been, with hindsight we glimpse the benefits of knowledge coupled with imagination.  How an invention can become much improved when creativity is allowed to flourish.  It’s then that the invention is given that “Wallah!” moment.

China invented Gunpowder (sulfur, charcoal and potassium nitrate) and for 400 years used it as a propellant for firework displays.  And then along came innovation, coupled with creativity that transformed how gunpowder was used, it became a powder keg that changed the world, or so we think…

I can’t be certain, but it seems that AARP missed an opportunity as well.

When an organization fails to gather and collect data in a cohesive way; when it doesn’t or won’t see further along than the tip of its nose; won’t or can’t make datasets or gather intelligence and other health information, or use financial graphs to determine best use practices, when an organization that starts out gathering so many people in a collective membership can think of little more than to sell its members on the benefits of Cellular One- Smartphones, with easy read displays and extra large numbers… the question we should ask is:  “What if AARP did something great, really great?”

Our numbers are that great; as great as our expectations once were.  We, Baby Boomers, the original pioneers of the internet are a treasure trove of Big Data.

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Filed under AARP, Baby boomers, Big Data, Creativity, cyber-security, Uncategorized

Slotted Technology- Visionary

slot-cars-1-d

Dear Reader, if you’re reading this, then we are in all likelihood, still connected like slotted race cars.

But what if technology is a disruption to our way of life?

There’s a part of me that just wants to hurry up and get old, so that I can see innovative technology in its golden years, in all its glory! Both tweaked and fully operational, as it was destined to be and not just downloadable bits & pieces that we agree to patch.

Innovative technology that’s specifically bought & sold, without warranty because it’s guaranteed already fully functioning, as it was designed to do.

It would be extremely nice to have the technology work in my home, as well as it did at Apple’s Genius Bar and be less daunting. Or at the very least, serve beer or cocktail for a user friendly environment.

Because as I go from rock & roll to rocking chairs and Nana launchers, those Lazy-Boy chairs with the easy stand-up lift, I want to glimpse the really good technology.  The kind of technology that improves the human condition and turns lives around.

Truth is, we all need a little more giddy-up and go in our smart technology.  So innovative that we all agree on climate change; we all see our better selves and we realize in  Maya Angelou’s words: “We are more alike my friends, than we are different.”

A future where tolerance is celebrated, patience is enjoyed and respect is doled out in equal proportions.  Surely if we can make driver-less cars without adding slots to our highways and roadways, we can…

Visionaries see that there is more on earth and it’s worthy.   Me?  I’m hurrying up to grow old, so I can catch up to technology & stay connected to people like you.

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Technology: Can We Live Without Plug-n-Play?

If not for Plug n Play

Sliding rulers always cause me to pause, if not for them where would we be?  USB technology is like that.

There was a time, when pocket protectors were like badges.  Mostly worn by those with above average intelligence, who felt comfortable with numbers.  People who owned a lot of pens, that wrote in multiple colors.  People who didn’t use a calculator to figure out the circumference of a circle, or how much to tip the waiter.  But who used a calculator to confirm answers that they already reached in their heads.

Life was simple and a pop quiz, was meant to gauge how much we knew, and what more we needed to learn.   It wasn’t quantum physics and the classroom wasn’t a prison.  The library, public and private were sanctuaries, where books evoked our imagination and inspired our adventures.

We believed in the world’s potential and we believed in ourselves.  We freely admitted limited knowledge of cyber kinetics, robotics and transportation, but were excited by the possibility!  Technology then, as it is now was exciting, it fueled innovation without teaching itself.

But something happened.  It may have always been there, nestled in the corners but when technology mixed into our daily lives, something went awry.  At first it was subtle, we interacted with automated teller machines (ATMs), we had always struggled with balancing the checking book, never enough money so nothing new there.  But then we pretended as if we knew and feign a smile as if we fully understood what we had only partially comprehended.

Our approach to life changed, people with the pocket protectors, became revered techies.  We eagerly numbered one or two among our friends and casually coaxed them out of basements and away from garages.  Hoping to invite them into our homes to take a look at our new personal computer that was just sitting there… unattached.  We quickly understood that geeks as we had called them, had a natural ability to delve into computer processing, and they easily interacted with connector pins, parallel ports, ROM and RAM.  They knew the jargon and could install drivers that made it go!

Where we had cursed a cursor that blinked and got hung up, the techie patiently typed and the computer responded.  Again, technology was exciting!  So we pretended we understood his instructions as we waved goodbye at the door, but deep down inside we felt hopelessness.  And then, before we got to admit that we didn’t get it, technology changed again.

It just went on about its business without the masses.  Rather than dumb down, tech developers just reversed the process and called a CPU a black box.  Convinced us that we didn’t need to know what was inside, that it would work and we humans would be very efficient when we used it, and so we did and they were right.  Hello World!

The Universal Serial Bus was a game changer, literally connecting us to our devices.  The thumb drive to the universal Plug-n-Play opened up vistas and we all became proficient at the same time.  We didn’t have to learn anything, no instructions, no lessons and no quizzes.  And we all started to relax, new technology has that affect on us.  Lulled into a false sense of security.  We created new words by simply adding an adjective to a noun– SmartTech: Smartphone, Smarthome, Smartwatch and Smartcities.   But where would we be without the power of USB Plug-N-Play?

Next week, there’ll be a Pop quiz…    hope we’re prepared.

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Filed under Baby boomers, PlugnPlay, SmartTech, technology

Tech Up

Coat of Arms cirsuit boards

How do we respond when we’re told that the only stupid question is the one that wasn’t asked? Hopefully, we ask.

It’s particularly important as technology continues to advance, placing more and more information readily at our fingertips and moving away from the notion that arches, loops and whorls, those distinctive patterns of our fingerprints are the only reliable mode of human identification.

Facial recognition systems allow a computer app to identify and verify a person from a digital image or a video frame from a video source, using selected facial features and a database.

When used with other biometric technology, including those fingerprints and eye iris scans, facial recognition can be extremely accurate at identifying us, but what’s beyond the pale is the social laissez-faire towards facial technology.

More often it’s being used on social media to identify who attended the bachelorette bash, the summer cook-out or the family reunion and it’s posted without intent of malice. Those smiling faces, young and old gathered together to celebrate life.

All very neatly named and tagged on FaceBook, Instagram and on SnapChat, and all shared with family and friends who weren’t invited, or who for a myriad of reasons, were unable to attend.  So many digital photographs curated and posted on the internet, forever.

And what about the little round faces, with pudgy cheeks who unknowingly and unwittingly have their photos taken over and over?  So innocent, just a photo taken of a little girl, that  should never have become a part of an illegal drug ring, or reappear in a trade magazine or be confiscated in a botched raid, one that included fake IDs’, but some how did.  And years later, that little girl grows up and is interrogated or denied international travel, misidentified because an age progressed photo “guesstimated” her adult facial features?  We humans, after all  have but one face to be digitalized, recognized and identified.

Children grow up, people grow old and fancy pictures of our younger selves.  Humored by how young we looked, but somehow, long after time and the natural elements of this world have caused our faces to wrinkle and our memories have begin to fade, what about all those photos?  Who’ll ask us then, is that a picture of you?

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Filed under Apps, Photo, photography, Selfie, technology

Tech Armor, A Girl’s Security

Techny Armor 2

In many ways, the radio is old timey technology.  A throw back of simpler times, when air waves weren’t modulated and a slight hum was tolerable, as was fumbling with the dial to bring the station in clear.  Nowadays, I only listen when I’m alone driving in my car.

In that closed interior, with the world just beyond my windshield, I’m comforted to hear a voice other than the one in my head.  I tire of reminders,  conflict in my schedule, errands that I need to run and I things left undone, like the shirt that requires my attention and the button I keep forgetting to sew back on.  The radio’s DJ is friendly, almost bubbly with idle chatter, pertinent today, and boring enough so I don’t have to focus all of my attention, half-listening and half being indifferent and non-opinionated.

This is pure technology, copper wire and vacuum tubes, transistor radios, soldered circuitry that’s also portable.  Radio reaches people in a way that television never will, because there’s no visual accompaniment to distort one’s own self-image.   Without product placement, without luxury and without perfect abs.  Instead we’re captivated by a voice, the radio personality’s enthusiasm and a distinct annunciation of words.  In between commercials, there’s a nice mix of music.  I like singing along, belting out a Frank Sinatra song or absent mindedly humming along to Billie Holiday’s August in New York.

Ironically, I always have perfect pitch when no one else is the car, my inner ear comes out.   And then, the very best part of radio, is during the “goldie oldie” moment, when that one long forgotten song comes on and miraculously, I know the lyrics!  And soon the warm feelings return, the powdery fluff of nostalgia.  It makes me smile to myself, as I drive along the road.  And I’m reminded again that simple technology, like the radio has a powerful control over me.

Yesterday, a DJ invited listeners to call in with their stories.  One woman called in excitedly, she had recently lost 150 pounds.  Her happiness oozed from the radio’s airwaves.  This stranger made me smile.   Like her, as a kid I too had been teased, she plagued by obesity and me with my big nose.

Now, here she was on the radio sharing the fact that she carried an old photograph and called it a “Fattie-Selfie”,  a reminder of her former self.  And that was it, the radio personality acknowledged her achievement, told her that she was beautiful!  And then thanked her for calling in, made an off-handed comment about the telephone lines being lit up and took the next call.

I blinked, the era of stringed pearls and frilly aprons forever gone.  I glanced at my reflection in the rearview mirror.  Like the radio caller, I too was now comfortable with my looks, I seem to have grown into my big nose.  Or I wasn’t as self-conscious, perhaps a result of being too busy to take notice.  Still, I recall what it felt like, to not resemble the models in any of the fashion magazines.  When I was a young girl, fairytales always made me think being powerless was okay, by taking away the option of having power, as if by design.

As I pulled into an empty parking space, I saw a group of little girls eating ice-cream laughing, and enjoying their silliness.  They were at that perfect age, when looks don’t matter and eating has nothing to do with disorders.   That being self-sufficient means she can tie a good knot in her shoelaces, as a preamble to running wild and free.

The radio DJ introduced a new song, it was upbeat and a perfect segue from the girls back to my reality.  I reached over to cut the car engine off and thought those little girls will make their own shiny suits of armor; I hope it fits them well.

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Filed under Gender, Gender Equality, Girls, technology

Technology Safe

Brain tinkering 2

In a knowledge-based economy, where everything is always on- demand and live-streaming, the old adage of having the whole world in the palm of one’s hand, for all intent and purposes is a reality.

The fast paced advances that we’ve seen in mobile technology have opened a wide swath of possibilities to how corporations conduct their business to how they support employees and reach their customers. Enterprise mobility is one of those tools that like a hammer, adds to the business’ toolbox and makes every problem look small.

Part of that success is scalable; it’s replicable and most important it’s manageable. These three things weren’t always compatible, but we’re seeing developers tackle problems ahead of impact. Apps are being introduced on a daily basis that address issues, recognize problems and enhance the user experience, both customizable and in real time.

This has created more opportunities for businesses, as both employees and customers pick up their devices —smartphone, tablets and laptops to access the internet from wherever they are, whenever they choose and it’s in this stay connected Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) environment that makes enterprise mobility feasible. But giving employees total access to the company’s information has risks, making confidential data vulnerable to hacks and other security concerns.

And the responsibility to protect information isn’t the employees or the customers, but in effect becomes the enterprise’s burden. Because as a customer I’ve only loaned you my data, my rights haven’t been given or bartered away, beyond the reasonable time frame that it took for me to conclude my business with you.   And while the convenience is shared, your website having provided a gateway as if by magic on my sidebar and me going ahead and clicking, doesn’t absolve how we became engaged.  After all, entrapment in the digital world leaves footprints, and my use of any app is limited.  But, I do love the appeal of interfacing seamlessly without stepping a foot outside of my door, but the truth is I believed it when I read that my data was, I was assured, safe from hackers.

So, imagine my surprise when I received a letter via snail mail!

Interestingly enough, I can hardly recall that transaction.  It seems that data breaches can take on average, up to 200 days to detect, that’s quite a long time.   And scrambling to assess the extent of the damage, before acting on it and then issuing new credit cards, seems a pathetic waste.   Did you know that $200billion is the projected global economy loss due to a data breach?  Me either.    It seems an expensive way of conducting business in a digital world.  Come to think of it, it might be cheaper to maintain an ongoing dialogue with everyone and to hire cyber-security to help keep what needs to be safe, safe.

 

 

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Filed under Consumers, cyber-security, Mobile enterprise